What Is A Fireplace Back Panel?

A fireplace back panel is a type of decorative wall covering that goes on the back of your fireplace. It can serve as an aesthetically pleasing addition to your home and help you save money by reducing heating costs in winter. The panels are typically made from metal, but they also come in other materials such as fiberglass or stone veneer.

A fireplace back panel is a metal or wooden panel that protects the inside of your fireplace from soot and other debris. The job of this panel is to prevent anything from entering the chimney when you’re not using it but still allow for airflow when in use. It also keeps any objects that are in front of the fireplace from being able to fall into the fire.Gas Fireplace

What Is A Fireplace Back Panel?

A fireplace back panel is a piece of equipment that can be installed as an alternative to the traditional brick or stone surface. There are many benefits associated with this type of design, and it is becoming quite popular in home renovation projects. The panels themselves come in various shapes and sizes; however, they all rely on fireproof insulation materials such as mineral wool (glass fiber) and high-density board behind them to provide support for the actual face product. This article will explain some additional information about how these products work, what types exist, their installation process, safety precautions you should take when working around fireplaces…

A fireplace back panel is a wooden support structure on the rear of your firebox. This one-piece frame extends from behind the mantle to below the floor, acting as the sturdy spine for attaching mantles, shelves, and other decorative components that are flush with the face of an upright brick or stone wall in front and to either side.

This panel is usually made of wood, but may also be fashioned from steel or wrought iron for designs that call for a sturdier material. Although this part does not play an active role in the actual fireplace burning process, it’s integral to your firebox design and its strength contributes greatly to the overall quality of your installation.

Once installed you can attach decorative components like mantles shelves and other items flush with the front face of your brick stone wall surface behind. This one-piece frame extends out past the mantle shelf stopping at floor level acting as a sturdy spine connecting all different elements together seamlessly where they meet on each side. A fireplace back panel is customarily manufactured using high-grade kiln-dried solid hardwood plywood or with metal like steel or wrought iron.

This part does not play an active role in the actual fireplace burning process but it’s integral to your firebox design and its strength contributes greatly to the overall quality of installation where all different elements meet. It extends out past the mantle shelf stopping at floor level acting as a sturdy spine connecting all together seamlessly on each side.

You can attach decorative components like mantles shelves etc also flush with the front face of the brick stone wall surface once installed. All these are customarily manufactured using high-grade kiln-dried solid hardwood plywood or sometimes even steel or wrought iron which is sturdier material for specific designs that call for the same. One thing very important, to check how thick the back panel should be. It should not be so thin that it will scratch or mar the wall surface when you push things up against it and certainly shouldn’t bow in the middle under pressure from above either because then your mantels shelves etc won’t sit flush with the front face of brick stone walls.

This part does not play an active role in the actual fireplace burning process but it’s integral to your firebox design and its strength contributes greatly to the overall quality of installation where all different elements meet. It extends out past the mantle shelf stopping at floor level acting as a sturdy spine connecting all together seamlessly on each side. You can attach decorative components like mantles shelves etc also flush with the front face of the brick stone wall surface once installed.How to Remove Paint from Fireplace

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All these are customarily manufactured using high-grade kiln-dried solid hardwood plywood or sometimes even steel or wrought iron which is sturdier material for specific designs that call for the same, while one thing very important check how thick this panel should be because it shouldn’t be too thin that will scratch mar the wall when you push things up against it and certainly shouldn’t bow in the middle under pressure from above.

Why you should have Fireplace Back Panel installed?

  • A Fireplace Back Panel is a decorative brick back panel that hides the nonworking portion of your fireplace. This helps to add elegance and style to your living space.
  • It can be installed by simply attaching it over the existing bricks or mortar framework, so you don’t have to do any complicated construction work yourself!

The different types of Fireplace Back Panels available on the market

Today Fireplace back panels are a great addition to any fireplace, but what exactly is it? A fireplace back panel can be made of many different materials and this article will highlight three popular types of the most common. It’s important to consider several factors when purchasing one including your budget, style preference, and material durability before making a final decision on which type you want for your home.

Why should you use a back panel?

A fireplace is great for making your home feel warm and inviting, but the exposed brick can be an eyesore. Installing a back panel will hide all of those unsightly bricks from view while still allowing heat to escape from the firebox. There are various types available including stone panels, glass, or metal inserts, so depending on what type best fits with your style preference one might work better than others.

Removing A Fireplace Back Panel

The first thing you’ll need to do is remove the glass and metal door that covers it. This can be done by loosening screws, lifting up on the front of the fireplace back panel, or sliding towards one end then lifting off/outwards. Once removed, take note as to what color your brick looks like underneath (it may appear darker) because this will affect how much paint you use when painting over it! You’ll also want to make sure there are no bits of debris left behind such as dust and ash etc.

Once you’ve removed the fireplace back panel, you can then choose to paint it or not. This step really depends on how much time and effort you want to put into your project because painting a brick fireplace is no easy task! If done right, however, it will make all of the difference aesthetically speaking. You can try using an airless sprayer if this seems like too daunting of a job for your liking but there are plenty of other options available as well such as rattle cans/paintbrushes etc. Just be creative with what resources are at your disposal!

If after doing so though, should decide that painting isn’t for you- have no fear -you still have several options to choose from. You can paint it the same color as your wall, you could try using a combination of two colors or even use wallpaper! There are so many creative options available for this step that it really is up to you and what your personal preference/style happens to be.fireplace

Once you’ve decided whether or not to paint, follow the steps below on how to properly remove debris then apply primer before moving onto painting if necessary.

Remove Debris

The first thing you’ll need to do when removing debris is swept away any loose dust particles by hand (tape off surrounding areas should there be too much) with either an old broom/dustpan set etc., vacuum cleaner (if possible), or a handheld duster. If these options aren’t available to you, a damp rag should work fine as well!

Once that is done, if your fireplace back panel has any writing on it from previous owners etc., feel free to use either paint/wallpaper remover or even simple white vinegar and water solution (50:50 ratio) then gently wipe away the markings with a used scrubbing brush until they are gone. This part will take time but be patient because once all of the writing is removed, don’t forget to rinse off with clean water before allowing it to dry completely!

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Afterward, give your brick fireplace another sweep/vacuum session in order to rid yourself of any remaining particles yet again just to make sure.

Primer Application

After finishing the previous steps, it’s now time to apply primer! You can do this using a brush or even an airless sprayer if you have access to one and feel comfortable doing so (if not- don’t worry!). Just be sure that whichever method you choose is done in a neat/orderly fashion as possible because priming brick isn’t easy by any means and requires much attention given to detail. Make sure that every single nook and cranny of your fireplace back panel has been covered with the stuff before moving onto painting…else you will regret it later on down the road should such mistakes occur!

Painting Application & Tips

Once everything looks good from a distance, it’s now time to get painting! If you plan on using a combination of colors – do so in the same fashion as you would if applying wallpaper. That is by base coating with one color than going back over again with another after allowing sufficient drying time between applications. Once that part is done, allow said paint/paintbrushes, etc., set overnight just to be sure they are nice and dry before proceeding onto adding a sealer which can also be applied via brush or airless sprayer depending on preference (see “priming application” step regarding tips).

Sealing & Conclusion

Finally comes sealing your fireplace brick from all damages such as watermarks, mold growth due to wet conditions for an extended period of time, etc. If you have a wet/dry shop vacuum available to you – use it! Just be sure that the settings are on “blow” and not “suck” so as to ensure all of your hard work doesn’t go down the drain with any loose debris still present in said crevices should they exist, or other small openings for that matter).

Once you believe everything is dry enough (give it another 12 hours just to make sure), grab yourself some sandpaper (a fine grain such as 220 grit) then give each section an extra once over using long even strokes for best results before moving onto finish up by applying polyurethane via brush or airless sprayer. This final step will require several coats in order to get the desired results – allow adequate drying time between applications.

Conclusion: Once everything looks good from a distance, it’s now time to get painting! If you plan on using a combination of colors- do so in the same fashion as you would if applying wallpaper. That is by base coating with one color than going back over again with another after allowing sufficient drying time between applications. Have any questions? Feel free to contact us for more information regarding fireplace brick backs today! We are happy to help 🙂

Replacing A Fireplace Back Panel

If you’re looking to replace a fireplace back panel, it is important that you understand the difference between your options. While there are many types of materials available for this purpose, their differences can make or break how long they last and whether they stand up to wear and tear over time. One option includes wood-burning fireplaces.Muskoka 42" Sable Mills Grey Faux Stone Mantel Electric Fireplace

These are the traditional fireplaces that use logs for fuel. Back panels can be made from a variety of materials to include cast iron, steel, copper, and other metals.

These materials are usually coated to protect against rust and make the fireplace more decorative.

Another option for your back panel is a gas model that has an electric starter or igniter instead of logs. These types do not require as much maintenance, but they can be more expensive than wood-burning models. Electric fireplaces will also use electricity which may mean additional costs over time if you choose to leave them on all day long.

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There are other options available including ones made from glass with metal supports, stone panels, fiberglass models, and others. It all depends upon what type of look or feel you want in the room where it will go. If budget is an issue, consider choosing one that uses less fuel so there won’t be as much cost over time.

If you are looking to replace your fireplace back panel, make sure that you understand the different types of materials available and how they can help determine what will work best for your home or other building where it is being installed.

Safety Tips for Using a Fireplace

  • Has your chimney been cleaned annually? Do not burn paper in the fireplace – it produces deadly carbon monoxide, which is odorless and colorless. Before you start burning wood, make sure that there are no flammable materials or anything combustible near the fireplace opening.
  • Open your flue before you start to use the fireplace. Burn seasoned wood only, not green or unseasoned logs. Greenwood will create more smoke and sap that can damage chimneys. Do not keep fire burning overnight or while you are away from home at work all day, for example – even if it’s just a single coal bed. Carbon monoxide poisoning is an insidious killer which has no warning signs of its presence until too late!
  • Make sure that the ashes are cold before you dispose of them. -Do not burn garbage in your fireplace – it will emit dangerous chemicals into your home’s air supply, which can cause cancer and other diseases!

FAQs

How do I choose the right fireplace back panel?

The first thing you want to consider is how much money you are willing or able to spend. You can find some good deals on mantels, but there will always be a distinction between cheap materials and quality construction with an expensive price tag. While it may cost more upfront, investing in your fireplace’s finish at this point of the installation could mean that everything else goes smoothly without any issues later down the line if repairs need to be made. A high-quality fireplace back panel should last for many years, so don't skimp out on material costs when making this investment!

How do I know if my fireplace back panel is damaged?

It can be difficult to tell, as there are many variables that could contribute. The first thing you want to check for is any obvious damage like missing or broken pieces; then move on to looking at more internal components and hidden areas. Since the firebox of a wood-burning stove will get very hot (upwards of 2000 degrees Fahrenheit), it’s important not only to inspect your fireplace from above but also to look down into its depths through an opening in the front face. If you see anything suspicious, give us a call so we can come out and take a closer look!

Do I need to replace my fireplace back panel if it is damaged?

This depends on the extent of the damage. If you have a burned or melted mantel, then yes this will definitely need a replacement; however, there are also other less visible forms of damage that can occur over time which might not be as obvious. Take for example your fireplace’s firebox lining (also known as hearth pad). This material needs to meet certain requirements in order to provide protection from the heat generated by your wood stove and stop embers from leaving its confines—if any pieces are missing though, they could pose serious risks!

Conclusion

It’s always best to go with a custom fireplace back panel. This will ensure that you don’t have any issues and the firebox is the perfect size for your needs!