Kiln Dried Firewood (A Complete Guide)

Kiln-dried firewood is the best type of wood that you can buy. It has superior qualities to other types of firewood, and it may cost a little more than some other options on the market, but it’s worth every penny. This guide will cover everything you need to know about kiln-dried firewood so that you don’t go wrong with your purchase!

The beauty of fire is unmatched. It’s warmth, the light, the crackling sound – it really is an experience that can’t be replicated. The problem with most fires though is that they are either too big or not big enough. If you want to have a consistent supply of wood for your fireplace and stove throughout the year, then you need kiln-dried firewood at your disposal. This article will provide everything you need to know about preparing for winter!firewood

What Is Firewood That Has Been Kiln Dried?

Firewood is a type of renewable energy since it can be used to heat homes and produce electricity. Most people know, however, that firewood has an important drawback: It tends to burn quite slowly (and thus release less heat) when compared with gas or oil. If you’re looking for faster-burning wood then kiln-dried firewood may be the best choice for your needs.

What Is Firewood That Has Been Kiln Dried?

Firewood is a type of renewable energy since it can be used to heat homes and produce electricity. Most people know, however, that firewood has an important drawback: It tends to burn quite slowly (and thus release less heat) when compared with gas or oil. If you’re looking for faster-burning wood then kiln-dried firewood may be the best choice for your needs.

What Is Kiln-Dried Firewood Used For?

Kiln-dried firewood is used for a variety of purposes, including heating your home during the winter months. Whether you are using it in an indoor stove or fireplace, outdoor fire pit, outdoor heater, etc., kiln-dried wood offers many advantages over traditional “wet” wood that has not been treated to reduce moisture content.

  • It will burn hotter and cleaner, leaving less soot behind on your fireplace or woodstove.
  • Since the firewood has been dried to a lower moisture content of 25% or less, it is easier to light than wet wood which can have a moisture content of 50% or higher. This means you don’t need kindling when starting fires in stoves, fireplaces, etc., making life much simpler for anyone who enjoys “fire time” with family members!
  • You will save money by purchasing kiln-dried instead of regular uncured firewood that costs more because it takes longer to dry out after being cut down from trees.

What Is Kiln Drying? How Does Firewood Become Wet Wood?

Firewood that is sold at local hardware stores, grocery store chains, home improvement centers, or gas stations have most likely been standing in a yard for some time. It will have absorbed water from the ground and surrounding foliage through osmosis – meaning it can contain up to 50% moisture content by weight!firewood

  • Wet firewood cannot be burned immediately because it takes much longer to dry out due to its high moisture level.
  • The wood must first “season” over several months until enough of the moisture evaporates off into the air so that you are left with seasoned hardwood instead of wet tinder. This means you either pay more per pound for kiln-dried wood now or wait many months before using wet wood which may get moldy, get bugs in it (if you store inside), or even die off because of bacteria.
  • Kiln drying reduces the moisture content of the wood to 25% or less so that wet firewood can be used right away without having to wait for months!

How Is Firewood Dried? How Long Does It Take To Dry Out Wood?

There are two types of kiln dryers used on a commercial scale: horizontal and vertical drum-type machines. The larger ones will have the capacity to hold several cords at once while smaller units may only be able to handle one cord per day – meaning they would take much longer than necessary when trying to meet increased demand from customers buying this quality product. In either case, the process is similar.

  • The firewood is placed on racks inside of an airtight cylindrical drum with openings for heat to enter and escape at various points along the cylinder wall.
  • A powerful fan blows in warm, dry air around all sides of the wood which causes moisture trapped within its cells to evaporate into water vapor while simultaneously pulling more oxygen through each opening along the way – this makes it ideal for drying any type of lumber including hardwoods like oak, maple, ash, cherry or softwoods such as poplar or pine! This means you can use practically any kind of firewood you want once it has been kiln-dried rather than just sticking to one species or another that may be harder to find locally.
  • The more openings you have along the length of the drumming result in a faster drying process, while if there are fewer open points for air to enter and exit at, it will take longer.

What Are Some Advantages Of Kiln Drying Firewood?

Kiln-dried firewood has many advantages over traditional “wet” wood that’s been sitting around with high moisture content. Once it’s placed inside a kiln dryer that is set into motion by turning on all fans, heaters, and blowers needed to create an ideal environment for removing water from within each piece of wood – no matter what size or shape they may be! There are several benefits including * It burns hotter so less fuel is used to create the same amount of heat compared to wet wood.firewood

  • You can start a fire in your stove or fireplace much faster without having to wait for kindling, newspaper, etc. because it is already dried out and ready to go when you are!

* It will produce more BTUs per pound due to increased density from less water weight which means it will burn longer with lower emissions since all that moisture takes up space inside each log – meaning what’s leftover is mostly dry sawdust ash instead of green burning “tars” that clog flues and spark dangerous chimney fires if not cleaned often enough by professionals!

The Advantages Of Kiln Dried Firewood

  • Doesn’t smoke or spark, so it is perfect for fireplaces and closed stoves.
  • It prevents creosote buildup that causes chimney fires.
  • Less likely to attract insects like ants or termites because there is no moisture present in kiln-dried wood. When you buy furniture made of kiln-dried lumber, the finish won’t peel off with time due to water damage (this can happen if your humidity meter reads over 20%).
  • Burns are hotter than regular firewood.
  • Dries faster after rain or snowfall, so it is always ready to burn.

Moisture Content of Firewood that has Been Kiln Dried

The moisture content of kiln-dried firewood is anywhere from 15% to 20%, depending on the particular species. This means that your wood will burn cleaner and more efficiently than wet or green firewood, but it’s also possible you won’t be able to light a fire with it right away.

Here are some tips for using kiln dried logs:

  • Cut the wood into smaller pieces and let it dry for a day or two. You should also split the logs to expose the inner parts of them to air, which will help with drying before you light your fire.
  • This process can take up to six months depending on how big each piece is and where you live (dry areas such as New Mexico may require less time than green states like Oregon). If you don’t have this kind of patience, there are several ways that allow you to use kiln-dried wood right away:
  • Make an outdoor fireplace by placing rocks around a metal grate over the top of some sand. Place your new logs within the perimeter and then ignite! Once they catch flame, add more logs to your fireplace.
  • You can also use firewood logs in an indoor fireplace if you have one (and a chimney). Place the wood on top of some tinder and then light it with either matches or another lighter source. Once that catches flame, add more kindling until your log pile is burning properly. Add additional pieces as needed!firewood

Although kiln drying might seem like too much effort for many people who want to simply buy their wood at the store, once you’ve tried this process yourself, we think you’ll be glad you did! Kiln-dried wood burns cleaner than wet or green firewood does; plus it minimizes bugs from nesting inside your home unless they are already dead.

How Do You Know If Firewood Is Kiln Dried?

  • If you smell a strong chemical smell coming from the wood, that is most likely because it’s been kiln dried. Also, if you see a lot of cracks in the wood it has probably been seasoned with heat and moisture to dry out all of its water content – which means less energy burned!
  • Visually, you’ll want to look at the ends of the firewood. They should be cut clean and not split. Split pieces suggest that it has been left out in wet conditions for too long and may contain a lot of moisture still inside which will make burning difficult!
See also
How to Bundle Firewood? (User’s Guide)

Kiln Dried Wood vs. Other Types of Firewood: What’s the Difference?

When you’re buying firewood, it’s important to know what kind of wood you’re getting. While there are several types of firewood available for purchase, one type stands out among the rest: kiln-dried wood.

One common question when looking for the right kind of firewood is “What’s the difference between unseasoned and seasoned?” To put it simply, unseasoned or untreated lumber has not been exposed to any extreme heat that would dry out its moisture content. This means that burning this type of fuel can cause your chimney to become clogged with creosote build up more quickly than usual – which is a fire hazard.

Unseasoned wood is a better option for cooking fires since it produces less smoke and burns more efficiently, giving off a little bit of extra heat in the process. If you’re looking to use your wood stove as an additional source of home heating, though, seasoned or kiln-dried lumber should be recommended instead – this type of fuel has been dried out so that its moisture content won’t pose any threat to your chimney.

In addition to being safer than other types of wood-burning material, kiln-dried logs are also much cleaner because they don’t smolder after being lit on fire as unseasoned pieces can. It’s important not to confuse “clean” with “superficial,” though – when seasoned or unseasoned wood is burned in an open fire, large amounts of creosote can build up on the inside of your chimney. When these particles are left to accumulate for too long (typically between one and two years), they could potentially clog the flue entirely.

When it comes to getting rid of this substance once it has blocked your chimney, you have three options: hiring a professional cleaner; using special chemicals, or attempting to remove the creosote yourself. If you’re not comfortable doing any work around your home that requires climbing onto roofs like sweeping away debris from rain gutters, then calling a pro would be our recommendation – at least at first. If you’re up for the challenge, though, feel free to consult this article we’ve created about how to clean your chimney yourself.

Is kiln-dried wood better than seasoned firewood?

This is a common question that many people have. It’s also one of the most debated topics among firewood experts. The simple answer to this burning question is, yes it can be better. But there are some factors you must consider first before making your judgment on what type of wood you prefer with your fireplace or fire pit!

  • Wood dries by losing moisture through evaporation and diffusion over time whether it’s in an open environment or enclosed container such as a kiln so being dried using controlled heat speeds up this process dramatically.
  • When air is heated quickly, its volume expands rapidly causing water molecules inside the living cells to evaporate out faster than normal which then reduces internal pressure within each cell allowing them to collapse forming cracks, therefore, increasing the surface area of wood.
  • Moisture absorbs heat and slows down the rate at which it can be released so the more moisture in a log, the longer it takes to burn and produces less heat energy than dry firewood!
  • Being dried quickly also allows winter temperatures from northern climates to affect seasoning times as colder air doesn’t have much moisture content, therefore, allowing logs to stay outside for longer periods of time before being moved inside or burned!

Is It Worth Drying Your Own Wood?

  • The first question that you need to ask yourself before drying your own wood is whether it’s even worth the time and effort involved. Your extra dried firewood should be of no less quality than any other kiln-dried product on the market, so if someone can do it better then you probably shouldn’t bother trying.
  • You can’t simply dry your firewood in the backyard and expect it to be better than what you could buy from a reputable supplier.
  • You need to dry your wood as meticulously and as slowly as possible through a controlled drying process.
  • This is why buying kiln-dried firewood from professionals can often be more cost-effective than trying to do it yourself, even if you factor in fuel costs for running an industrial-sized oven all day long.firewood
  • If you’re drying small quantities of wood for your own use, then the extra cost probably won’t be worth it. In this case, buying from a reputable supplier might actually end up costing you less in the long run.
  • However, if you want to sell kiln-dried firewood on a large scale and have access to industrial ovens anyway (either through work or some other means), then going down this route can certainly save money in the long term even when factoring in fuel costs.

Problems With Kiln Dried Firewood

  • Firewood is usually sold in units of 16 cubic feet. This means that buyers are charged for the amount of wood they get, not how much space it takes up in their fireplace or fire pit. Because kiln-dried firewood can be compressed into a smaller area than its original size, customers don’t always know exactly what they are getting when buying this product. It may seem like you’re paying less money per unit but in reality, there might actually be more wood inside than with other types of wood products.
  • Kiln-dried firewood is heavier than dry or seasoned wood because it contains more water. This makes it difficult to transport and store, and if the product has been improperly packaged for storage, mold can form on the surface of the logs as they sit in a warehouse before being sold.
  • Most kiln-dried firewood products are made from fast-growing trees such as poplar which may grow quickly but don’t have high heat value or be long lasting like hardwoods such as oak or hickory. In fact, many people believe that “kiln-dried lumber” isn’t even real firewood at all since its moisture content is too low to burn efficiently compared with traditional “seasoned” logs – a process that can take several years.
  • Kiln-dried firewood products are sometimes sold as “seasoned” but this is not accurate since there is no industry standard for how long wood should be left to dry before it’s considered ready to use as kindling or fuel in a fireplace. In fact, kiln-dried logs may still contain up to 40 percent moisture – making them more difficult and costly than traditional seasoned firewood to burn effectively with the help of a chimney starter or other equipment used by experienced campers. And if you don’t have one of these tools, burning wet logs create so much smoke that your neighbors will know what you’re doing even from inside their homes!

Kiln Dried Wood Has Got Wet

Some wood that is dried in a kiln to reduce its moisture content may have gotten wet before it was put into the kiln. If this happens, the water will not be removed from the inside of the wood cells and could lead to mold or mildew forming on your firewood while you are burning it. Keep an eye out for any signs of mold when you are storing different kinds of types of dry firewood indoors.

Columns That Are Great For Storing Firewood Indoor

  • Columns that are tall and narrow or short and wide, like wine racks or bookshelves. This allows you to see the inside of each piece of firewood if it is stacked flat against a wall with other pieces on top of it. If there is any mold forming on your dry wood, you will easily be able to spot this while still keeping it out of reach from children or pets.
  • Plus, having them in columns makes for easy stacking when needed instead of haphazardly arranging them all over your floor which would make finding what kind of logs you need much more difficult than just reaching into one column at a time until you find exactly what type that you need.

Kiln Dried Wood Won’t Burn

Are you concerned that your firewood may not be suitable for burning? If so, then the answer is probably yes. There are a number of reasons why someone might think their wood will not burn well and it all comes down to one thing: moisture content. Moisture in wet or moist woods can sometimes stop them from lighting properly or even stopping them from catching alight at all.

See also
How to make Firewood?

This results in smoking embers which produce low heat output as they flicker away until eventually dying out without ever really getting hot enough to create any substantial warmth into your home. However, this doesn’t mean that you should automatically rule out using kiln-dried logs just because other sources claim they’re too dry to burn.

Kiln-dried logs are usually pre-dried before they’re pressed into the familiar conical tower shape that is so often seen in our homes today. This process ensures that there’s less water within each piece of firewood which helps it light easier and keeps burning for longer, making them ideal for using as a primary heat source during long winter nights when fuel efficiency really matters most.

It’s also worth noting here that kiln drying does not remove all moisture from wood; instead, it reduces the amount enough such that air can circulate through the log without any problems such as damp pockets stopping your fire from getting going or low levels of smoke billowing out while you try and stir up some flames.

Make sure you follow the steps below before deciding which is best for your home.

Kiln Dried Firewood vs Wet Firewood

When looking for firewood, there are two types to consider: wet and kiln-dried. Knowing the difference between wet and dry wood is key in understanding how it works best for your needs. Keep reading below to learn more about what you should look for when choosing firewood!

Dry wood has been dried very carefully to prevent any moisture from being left in the firewood. Dry kiln-dried firewood is typically considered more superior and longer lasting than wet or green (unseasoned) firewood. However, keep in mind that even dry wood can pose a risk if improperly handled.

Kiln drying tends to last much longer due to the fact that there is less water content; it also allows for easier storage since they are compact and lighter weight by volume. Also, because of this process, they produce less smoke when burned which makes them cleaner burning as well! They burn hotter thanks to their high concentration of energy potential compared with seasoned or wet firewood.

Kiln-dried wood has the highest energy potential of all types of firewood which means it is ideal for burning purposes such as cooking and heating your home when in a time crunch. It also produces less smoke, is cleaner burning, and burns hot!

Wet or green (unseasoned) wood tends to have more water content than kiln-dried firewood so they are heavier by volume but don’t last quite as long because there is still some moisture left within them after being cut down from their natural source. There will usually be a higher level of creosote buildup that can become dangerous if not properly monitored during use, especially indoors due to the increased risk of monoxide poisoning.

Wet Vs Dry Wood – What’s The Difference?

During the drying process, both types of wood are subject to changes in water content. But since kiln-dried firewood has been heating treated more quickly than air-dried firewood, it tends to have less moisture throughout its structure. This is often referred to as “surface seasoning.”

Air-dried firewood, on the other hand, is usually only at around 15% to 20% moisture content when it’s finally cut down. And because of this high level of water in its core and inner structure, you won’t be able to enjoy as many benefits from your wood-burning stove or fireplace as you would from kiln-dried firewood. But what exactly are those differences?

Kiln-dried firewood has been heated treated more quickly than air-dried firewood resulting in a less moist product throughout its structure that will allow for a better burn time and heat output. Air drying takes longer which ultimately results in higher levels of moisture throughout the entire piece of wood preventing optimal burn and heat output.

  • Kiln-dried firewood is able to deliver a better burn time and heat output than air-dried firewood due to the lower moisture content throughout its structure
  • Air drying takes longer which results in higher levels of water within the wood preventing optimal use
  • The differences between wet vs. dry wood can be found here: [link] (source)

Is it possible to burn kiln-dried firewood in a fireplace?

Yes, it is possible to burn kiln-dried firewood in a fireplace. Kiln-dried wood has been slowly prepared for burning over years of time by being stored outside where the sun and rain can reach them, making their moisture content lower than what you would find with freshly cut logs.

However, not all types of kiln-dried firewood are ideal for use within your home’s hearth or another indoor stove/fireplace device used during cold weather months!

Is it true that Kiln Dried Wood Can Be stored outside?

No, you should not store kiln-dried wood outside. Kiln-dried wood can last years if well maintained which is why it’s important to make sure the blocks are protected from rain and sun exposure before storing them for use during the winter months.

Is it true that kiln-dried wood burns longer?

According to the experts, kiln-dried firewood will burn longer than naturally dried wood. Kiln drying is a technique that removes moisture from green lumber and makes it safer for burning in stoves or other appliances. It also prevents the spontaneous combustion of natural logs when placed together for an extended period of time. However, some people claim that this type of dryness can actually decrease the fuel’s ability to produce heat because there is less water vapor present during combustion (it’s not released as steam).green wood

However, the National Wood Flooring Association claims that kiln-drying firewood actually reduces your overall burn time. Their reasons include:

  • Less surface area for evaporation because of lower moisture content in wood – It is harder to start a fire with dry pieces of wood so you need more material to generate enough heat – The higher energy needed at initial ignition can drain batteries or require longer physical effort
  • Firewood is usually sold by volume (cords), not weight. Kiln-dried logs will weigh less than naturally dried ones but may contain the same amount of actual fuel within them when measured by volume. This means that they are mostly air and very little water vapor which decreases their heating potential substantially. If you want long-lasting and efficient firewood, we recommend you go for seasoned logs.

Is it true that kiln-dried wood burns longer?

Kiln drying is a technique that removes moisture from green lumber and makes it safer for burning in stoves or other appliances. It also prevents the spontaneous combustion of natural logs when placed together for an extended period of time. However, some people claim that this type of dryness can actually decrease the fuel’s ability to produce heat because there is less water vapor present during combustion (it’s not released as steam).

However, the National Wood Flooring Association claims that kiln-drying firewood actually reduces your overall burn time. Their reasons include:

  • Less surface area for evaporation because of lower moisture content in wood – It is harder to start a fire with dry pieces of wood so you need more material to generate enough heat
  • The higher energy needed at initial ignition can drain batteries or require longer physical effort

Firewood is usually sold by volume (cords), not weight. Kiln-dried logs will weigh less than naturally dried ones but may contain the same amount of actual fuel within them when measured by volume. This means that they are mostly air and very little water vapor which decreases their heating potential substantially. If you want long-lasting and efficient firewood, we recommend you go for seasoned logs.

How Wood Is Kiln Dried

Kiln drying is a process that has been around for centuries. The first recorded example of this was in the Roman Empire when they used kilns to dry massive quantities of wood to build ships and bridges. Today, we use kiln-dried firewood because it’s easier to light, burns longer, produces less smoke/soot/creosote than other types of firewood, and there are many more benefits as well!

In order to understand why you should be using kiln-dried firewood instead of whatever comes from the woods or from your backyard pile from last year, let’s take a look at how exactly our fuel source goes through a process before being ready for burning.

Is kiln-dried wood better for the environment?

Except for using more energy, kiln-dried wood is better for the environment than green (wet) firewood. Chopping down trees and hauling them to a sawmill uses gas and oil that contribute to air pollution. Also, wet logs can raise water tables which may cause problems with flooding and drainage in areas close to rivers or lakes.

Safety Tips for Cutting Firewood

  • Use the right tools for cutting firewood. Use a sharp wood saw to cut logs into smaller pieces, and be sure it is in good working order before using it. Wear safety goggles or glasses when working with any type of power sawing tool. Better safe than sorry! Also, make sure you have sturdy shoes on your feet as well as long pants that are covered by work gloves to protect yourself from splinters while splitting logs.
  • Always use old socks if possible overwork boots when doing messy tasks like pumping water or cleaning out animal cages, they will absorb all the moisture rather than having wet footwear against the skin which can cause dangerous bacteria growth especially if there are cuts on the feet.
  • Know where your water supply is located and how much you will need to use before beginning any projects like building a campfire, grilling burgers, or washing dishes. This way there are no surprises about running out of water halfway through! Also, it’s important to be prepared for emergencies by keeping extra bottled drinking water around in case something bad happens (like a power outage).
  • Keep an eye out for poisonous snakes when working outdoors especially if they live nearby. It’s also smart to keep some kind of protection close by that can help ward off wild animals too such as pepper spray or bear mace because sometimes even though we think we’re safe the wildlife doesn’t always agree with us so better safe than sorry!
See also
Does A Wood Burning Fireplace Need A Screen?

FAQs

How much does kiln-dried firewood cost?

When you compare the price of wood stove fuel vs. your heating system, it is often less expensive to use dry fuel than buying traditional wet split logs and kindling. It takes more time to get a fire going with kiln-dried firewood (since it's already kindled into smaller pieces) but overall your energy costs will be lower due to faster burning times and longer-lasting heat output from hotter coals that last until morning!

What is the difference between kiln dried and air dried?

The main difference between kiln-dried firewood vs. air-dried firewood is that kiln drying involves a faster, more controlled process that can be completed in days or weeks while traditional air drying can take months to years depending on weather conditions. Kiln-dried wood generally weighs less than similarly sized pieces of traditionally air-dried wood because it has not been exposed to as much moisture loss through evaporation during its initial phase of seasoning.

How does cord volume compare with actual usable weight?

When you buy a full cord of wood from your local supplier, most will allow for 20% clearance around the outer perimeter (to leave room for stacking and transport). This means that a full cord of wood will actually be about 80% as dense as the amount you would buy if it was stacked inside your home. In other words, a full cord of green (unseasoned) hardwood weighs roughly 3000 pounds – but only around 2400 pounds after seasoning!

What type of firewood is best for my fireplace insert?

Any seasoned logs should work well in an existing masonry or metal fireplace with proper clearance from combustibles. You can also purchase a ventless stove designed to use either kindling-style fuel or traditional split logs depending on what works better for your situation. Read more here: Fireplace Inserts vs Wood Stoves.

Do I have to store my wood outside?

If you live in a climate with low humidity, high rainfall, and reasonably warm temperatures (between 30-90 degrees Fahrenheit), most seasoned firewood should be protected from direct exposure to the elements inside of an enclosed shed or garage. If your area is more humid than these conditions allow for, it may be necessary to build a protective enclosure around your stack using rot-resistant lumber such as cedar. Protecting your fuel supply will extend its usable life and reduce the risk of mold or mildew growth which can cause off-flavors when burned on your stove!

How much does seasoned vs. green firewood weigh?

As mentioned above: green hardwoods are generally about 3000 pounds per full cord while seasoned hardwood weighs around 2400 pounds per full cord.

What is the difference between seasoned vs. dry?

When you split or cut down trees in summer, the wood will lose moisture through evaporation over time until it reaches equilibrium with its surrounding environment (aka your backyard). This process can take several months to a year depending on where you live and how much heat/sunlight is exposed to the logs while seasoning outdoors. When green firewood has lost enough of its initial water content that it can be considered dry by International standards, this usually means that it contains less than 20% combined water & sap (free moisture) which prevents the growth of mold when stored indoors. If your log ends up being about 20% free moisture, it's usually safe to assume that the rest of your firewood is very close behind.

How can I tell if my logs are seasoned or not?

Weight is often an effective indicator of whether a split log has dried sufficiently but sometimes wood will feel light for its size which could be due to hollow sections where water was able to drain out faster than around the outer perimeter. If you're unsure about how dry your wood really is, there are several other ways including using a moisture meter and checking for mold & bug infestations! Read more here: How To Tell If Your Firewood Is Dry Or Seasoned.

What does air-dried vs kiln-dried mean in terms of firewood?

Traditionally, most hardwoods are cut and split in the early summer to allow for sufficient time indoors before winter temperatures begin. This method is known as air-drying because it's done outside where heat & sunlight help to speed up moisture loss by increasing surface area exposure (i.e., more logs). While air-seasoning takes longer than kiln-drying, this can also be a preferred option if you're looking for other benefits like reduced cost or less environmental impact compared with drying wood using electricity/chemicals.

How do I choose between cord, face cord vs fireplace cords?

A full-size cord of stacked seasoned hardwood should measure about 128 cubic feet but since firewood can be stacked differently, it's always best to check with your local stove provider or fire department for the most accurate estimate. A face cord is a common measurement used by landscapers and tree services which measure about 16 inches wide x 128 inches long but only includes wood that protrudes from the stack. In other words: face cords do not include any part of a log that remains buried within the pile! To compare apples-to-apples between different companies/locations you'll want to ask how many cubic feet are in each pickup truckload as this will give you an idea of what type of volume they're using when measuring their products (i.e., full cord vs face cord). This also ensures consistency across the board for customers who may have different units of measurement in their home regions.

What does seasoned firewood vs green firewood mean?

As mentioned above: green hardwoods are generally about 3000 pounds per full cord while seasoned hardwood weighs around 2400 pounds per full cord. Another way to think about this is that a face-cord of fresh-cut logs will weigh roughly 2000 lbs compared with 500 - 800 lbs after being split and then allowed to dry indoors over the course of several months or even years! In some cases, moisture loss can be so significant during long-term storage that it's still possible for weight & size measurements to change by 50%+ from when the wood was first harvested from the forest until the time it's seasoned indoors.

Which hardwood species are best for firewood?

There are too many variables to say that one type of wood is better than another when talking about general heating purposes because different regions will be looking for specific benefits like reduced smoke, increased flame height/heat output, or even the ability to burn unseasoned logs right away (i.e., green firewood). On average, common softwoods like pine and fir tend to produce more heat per unit weight which makes them preferable in colder climates while mid-range woods like oak & hickory can often generate less smoke overall but may also require slightly longer periods between cutting cycles compared with easy burning red cedar other fast-burning varieties.

Conclusion

The best way to get the most out of your firewood is by choosing kiln-dried wood. This type of fuel has been slowly and carefully dried, making it burn better than normal firewood. Firewood that was not properly cut or cared for can be difficult to start a fire with because there are pockets where water may still reside in them. With well-dried logs, you will have no trouble getting your fireplace going on even when the wind chill makes its outside feel like 0°F (-18°C).

Kiln drying also helps prevent bugs from infesting your home since they cannot survive without moisture. The end result is an easy starting log that burns hotter and longer compared to regular untreated pieces which means less work throughout the wintertime.