What’s Inside A Wood Burning Stove (With Real Pictures)

Wood has been a source of heat for centuries. When we talk about the history of wood, it is important to note that people have used wood as a fuel source since at least the Iron Age. Wood burning stoves are just one example of how humans have made use of this natural resource. In this blog post, we will go into detail about the inner workings and maintenance needed for these types of stoves.

What is a Wood Burning Stove

A wood-burning stove is a device that uses the combustion of fuel to heat living spaces. They are also used for cooking, and it’s a great way to stay warm during harsh winters where temperatures plummet below freezing.stove

A wood-burning stove is a device that uses the combustion of fuel to heat living spaces. They are also used for cooking, and it’s a great way to stay warm during harsh winters where temperatures plummet below freezing. Here’s a look at the components of this extremely versatile appliance.

Firebox

The firebox is the center of a wood-burning stove. This area contains most of the heat-producing activity that takes place within your stove, and it’s where you need to start for effective woodstove operation. If you pour too much fuel in at one time or if more air isn’t allowed into this region, then you could run into problems with backdrafting – when exhaust gases from inside the home are drawn back through your chimney instead of going up and out–and cause smoke to enter your living space.

Ash Tray

As mentioned before, ash accumulates at the bottom of a wood-burning stove. This is because tiny pieces of unburned fuel are left behind when you burn logs in your fireplace or stove. Ashtray collects this leftover material and makes it easy to dump out while cleaning up after using one of these heating appliances.

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If you do not have an ashtray available on your unit, make sure that any area where ashes accumulate has some sort of protection between surfaces so nothing gets damaged due to heat exposure.

  • Ash tray
  • Unburned fuel is left behind when you burn logs in your fireplace or stove.
  • Make sure that any area where ashes accumulate has some sort of protection between surfaces so nothing gets damaged due to heat exposure.
  • Ashtray collects this leftover material and makes it easy to dump out while cleaning up after using one of these heating appliances.
  • If you do not have an ashtray available on your unit, make sure that any area where ashes accumulate has some sort of protection between surfaces so nothing gets damaged due to heat exposure.

Flue Collar

The flue collar is located at the top of the stove pipe. It’s a round metal ring that seals off any gaps between your wood-burning stove and where it meets with the chimney stack, ensuring no smoke escapes into your home.

A chimney needs to be swept regularly if you want it to work properly, and a wood-burning stove is no exception. If your flue collar doesn’t seal off the space between the stove pipe and where it meets with the chimney stack, then smoke can leak into your home. For this reason alone, you need to make sure that any gaps around your flue collar are sealed completely or else risk having issues in the future.stove

This is particularly important during installation because there might be times when parts of the range hood components such as ducts cannot fit perfectly together due to irregularities on their surfaces caused by the machining process. These areas accumulate dust over time which could lead them to turn blackish over time. As for uncoated steel surfaces, the dust adheres to their pores and makes them look dull. As a result of this condition, they can create smoke or fire hazards if left unchecked over time.

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Baffle

A baffle plate in a wood stove is what separates the firebox from the smoke chamber. It’s usually made of cast iron or steel, and it prevents hot gases from flowing directly into the flue when they are released by burning fuel in the firebox. Instead, these gases must first cool down before exiting through this opening to allow for a better draft. Baffle plates are also known as “air” because air enters here to provide oxygen for combustion thus preventing soot buildup on its interior walls caused by incomplete combustion of carbon-rich fuels like wood and coal.

Baffles can be found inside both freestanding stoves that burn solid fuels such as wood pellets, logs, etc…and non-catalytic stoves that burn liquid fuels like propane, natural gas, etc…

Doors With Seals

The door of your wood-burning stove is made up of three different parts. The first part is the firebrick panels that you see on the inside of your unit, the second is a metal or cast iron air wash system to make sure there’s always enough oxygen for combustion and finally, seals around all openings which prevent heat escape. There can be many variations in design but these are some common components found in most stoves doors today.

Air Vents

Wood stoves always have an air vent with a damper. This is one of the most important parts because it controls how much oxygen gets to the fire, with too little and not enough will burn up before reaching your room.stove

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* Air vents: * A wood stove always has an air vent with a damper.* This is one of the most important parts as it controls how much oxygen gets to the fire, if there is not enough then things may burn out without getting into your room.

Other Parts Inside A Wood Burning Stove

Other parts inside a wood-burning stove include the baffle, smoke shelf, and ash pit. The function of the baffle is to deflect heat across the firebox where it’s needed most (usually at least four inches above). As you can imagine, this makes for an extremely hot spot in front of your fireplace or wood stove that would otherwise go unused.

The baffle also prevents the wood from burning too quickly by slowing down combustion. The smoke shelf is usually located just below the baffle and works to keep all of your heat in, where it belongs. It does this through its angled design that funnels hot gases back into the firebox for another round of heating action. Finally, there’s an ash pit underneath these parts—it looks like a metal box with a removable tray inside (usually made out of sheet metal).

The purpose of an ash pit is to catch any ashes or soot created while combusting fuel which otherwise would be spread throughout your home if left on top of your stove or fireplace floor. A good way to think about how the ash pit functions are to consider what happens when you pour milk into your coffee.