What kind of Firewood is Best for Fireplace? (A Complete Guide)

It’s the end of winter and you’re probably getting ready to fire up your fireplace for some much-needed warmth. If you’re like most people, then you want your fireplace to look as nice as possible – but that can be a challenge if it’s not set up properly! In this blog post, we’ll help guide you through what kind of firewood is best for a fireplace. We’ll also show you how to prepare a wood stack so that it looks good and heats efficiently.

One of the most common questions people have when they are getting ready to light a fire in their fireplace is what kind of firewood should they use. There are many different types and it can be difficult to know which one will work best for your needs. In this blog post, we will discuss the different types of firewood and how you can use them in your fireplace so that you never have this question again!firewood

Types of Firewood and their pros and cons

  • Oak is a great choice of firewood. It has high heat value per cord, burns extremely hot and long lasting, is very durable, resistant to bugs & pests which makes it perfect for outdoor fires. However this type of wood does not smell too pleasant when burned (it has an acrid smoke), can be expensive on the short term, and can be difficult to split.
  • Hickory is a great all around choice for firewood. It has high heat value per cord, burns hot and long lasting, smells pleasant when burned, is relatively easy to split, and is not too expensive. The only downside is that hickory can be hard to find in certain regions.
  • Beech is a good choice for firewood as well. It has a high heat value per cord, burns very hot and long lasting, doesn’t toss too much embers or smoke while burning, and produces less creosote buildup in chimneys compared to other types of wood (it’s the best type to use if you have a fireplace insert). However this type of wood is not particularly easy to split, can be relatively expensive on the short term if you don’t have access to free sources.
  • Apple is another good choice for firewood as it also has high heat value per cord. It burns long lasting and produces less embers than most types of trees/firewood. It also gives off a nice smell when burned and is relatively easy to split. The downside is that apple can be difficult to find in certain regions.
  • Pine is the most common type of firewood, and it has low heat value per cord. However, pine is still a decent choice for firewood as it burns hot and produces less smoke/embers while burning. It also has a pleasant smell when burned, and is very easy to split due to its softness (and it’s usually free if you get your hands on coniferous trees). The downside of using pine for firewood is that the wood can act like a sponge which absorbs moisture, making it difficult to start a fire and causing the wood to deteriorate faster.
  • Cottonwood is not a very popular choice for firewood, but it does have some good qualities. It has high heat value per cord, burns hot and long lasting, and doesn’t toss too much embers or smoke while burning. The downside is that cottonwood is very easy to split, which can lead to over-splitting and the wood not burning well. It’s also a common tree so it may be difficult to find in certain regions.
  • Eucalyptus is a good choice for firewood if you’re looking for something that burns with high heat value. However, this type of wood is not good for cooking as it creates a lot of creosote in chimneys, and it does not smell very pleasant when burned.
  • Birch has high heat value per cord but burns relatively quickly compared to other types of firewood. It’s also fairly easy splitting, gives off a nice smell while burning, produces little smoke/embers, and is not too expensive compared to other types of firewood. The main downside is that birch has a short burn time which means you’ll have to restock your woodpile more often if you’re burning this type of firewood.
  • Cherry also has high heat value per cord but it’s not as easy splitting as other types of firewood. It also doesn’t produce a lot of smoke/embers while burning, and has a pleasant smell when burned. The downside is that cherry can be quite expensive to buy.
  • Maple is another type of wood that has high heat value per cord. It burns very hot and long lasting, produces little smoke/embers while burning, and has a pleasant smell. However, maple is also relatively difficult to split.
  • Hickory has high heat value per cord, but it can be difficult to find in certain regions. It’s also not an easy type of wood to split due to its hardness and density which makes the job very time consuming. On top of that hickory doesn’t burn long lasting or well even when it is successfully split.
  • Walnut is a type of wood that has high heat value and burns relatively long lasting. It also doesn’t produce a lot of smoke/embers while burning, but walnut can be difficult to split.
  • Elder is not a popular choice for firewood because it doesn’t have very high heat value, doesn’t burn very hot or long lasting, and throws a lot of embers. Elder is also difficult to split due to its density, has an unpleasant smell when burned which can be off-putting for some people, and the wood itself burns at a slow pace so you’ll have to restock your supply often if using elder as firewood.
  • Alder is a type of wood that has good heat value, burns relatively hot and long lasting, doesn’t produce much smoke/embers while burning, and is easy to split. The downside of using alder for firewood is that it can be difficult to find in certain regions.

There are many different types of firewood available for purchase, but the best kind of firewood to use in your fireplace will depend on a few factors including where you live, the type of fireplace you have, and what you plan to use the firewood for. In general, coniferous trees such as pine and spruce make good firewood because they are easy to split, very dry, and they produce less smoke while burning.

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On the other hand, deciduous trees like oak or birch are not ideal for firewood unless you’re looking to cook with it because these types of wood create a lot of creosote in chimneys which can be dangerous if left untreated.

How to choose the best type of Firewood for your Fireplace?

There are many different types of wood for your fireplace, but what you choose will depend on the following factors:

  • How much firewood do I have available? What kinds of woods grow nearby? Do I need to purchase it or can I scavenge some from around my property?
  • Is this a temporary arrangement (few weeks or months), or am I going to use the fireplace regularly for years to come?
  • What is the climate where I live and what type of wood burns best in my region?

Different types of firewood have different burning properties. Here are some general guidelines:

  • Hardwoods, like oak and hickory, burn slowly and produce a lot of heat. They are good for long-term burning.
  • Softwoods, like pine and fir, burn quickly and create lots of sparks. They are better for short-term use or when you need a lot of heat quickly.

When selecting the best type of firewood for your fireplace, consider all these factors. You can get more specific information about which types of wood are preferred in your region by checking with the local forestry department or a good online resource like this one.

The best time to start a wood fire in your Fireplace

is when the temperature outside is dropping. The best wood to use in your fireplace is oak, maple, or ash.

The following are types of firewood and their corresponding heat output:

  • Oak: high heat output
  • Maple: medium heat output
  • Ash: low heat output

If you’re looking for a Fireplace that gives off a lot of heat, then oak is the best type of wood to use. If you’re looking for something that’s not as hot, ash is a good choice.firewood

When stacking your firewood, make sure that the kind of wood you want to burn is on the outside and the less desirable woods are in the middle. This allows for the best airflow.

  • Oak is a good choice for your Fireplace because it gives off high heat output.
  • If you’re looking for something that’s not as hot, ash is a good choice.
  • When stacking your firewood, make sure the kind of wood you want to burn is on the outside and less desirable woods are on the inside.
  • If you’re looking for a Fireplace that gives off a lot of heat, then oak is the best type of wood to use.

Tips on how to maintain a healthy, long-lasting wood fire

  • In order to have a healthy, long-lasting wood fire in your fireplace, you first need to select the right kind of firewood.
  • The best types of wood for a fireplace are oak, ash, hickory and maple. These woods contain high levels of sap and resin, which help them to burn slowly and produce a consistent heat.
  • Also, it is best to avoid firewood that contains paint or chemicals which could produce harmful gases when burned.
  • The next step in ensuring a long and healthy wood fire is maintaining the proper moisture level of your logs throughout the season. If you don’t maintain this balance between wetness and dryness, your logs could start to rot and produce creosote, a black sooty substance that can build up in your chimney and cause a fire.
  • To maintain the proper moisture level of your logs, you should store them in a covered area where they will be able to breathe. You can also purchase a log preserver, which will maintain the moisture level of your logs and keep them from drying out.
  • If you want to ensure that your wood fire is producing a consistent heat, it’s best to burn seasoned (dry) pieces of wood in smaller amounts throughout the day rather than burning fresh green or wet wood. This will produce less smoke and force more air into the fire, which will increase its efficiency.
  • If you want to produce a long and consistent burn throughout your wood fire, it’s best to place kindling and small logs around larger logs or pieces of wood in order to create an enclosed space that traps heat inside for longer periods of time. This technique is referred to as “dovetailing.”
  • In order to produce a high heat output, it is best to burn pieces of wood that are around an inch thick or larger because this will create more coals and embers, which provide longer periods of heat rather than flames.

Safety precautions when using an open flame indoors

  • Keep the fireplace, gas logs and chimney clean. Use a screen to prevent sparks from flying out of the fireplace onto your floor or combustible items nearby.
  • Make sure nothing is in front of or above the fire that could catch on fire.
  • Only use one flame at a time when burning wood in an open fireplace.
  • Do not overload the fireplace with wood.
  • Have a qualified professional inspect and clean your chimney at least once a year. Creosote, a byproduct of burning wood, can build up in the chimney and cause a fire.
  • Install carbon monoxide detectors near bedrooms to alert you of a carbon monoxide leak.
  • Apply for a permit to build an outdoor fireplace if you plan on building one yourself. If it is determined that the area where you want your built does not meet state requirements, you will be unable to receive a permit and will have to rethink your plans or hire someone else who can do the job properly.
  • Make sure everyone in the house knows how to put out a fire. Keep water close by and ensure that it can be accessed quickly if needed. Ensure you have both an indoor and outdoor fire extinguisher on hand, which should always be inspected regularly according to its use by date. Do not store them too near any heat source or in an overly damp area.
  • Keep a flashlight and battery operated radio near the fireplace at all times in case of emergency, especially if you are burning wood during the night time when it is harder to see what’s going on around you. Have an escape plan that everyone in your household understands clearly so that should something go wrong there will be no confusion.
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Now that we have gone over some safety precautions, let’s talk about the different types of firewood and what is best suited for your fireplace.

The most popular type of wood to burn in a fireplace is oak, as it burns slowly and emits a lot of heat. Other good choices include maple, birch and fruit trees.

  • Wood with a high sap and resin content will burn quickly and emit tons of heat, but they also produce large amounts of smoke which can be overwhelming for some people.
  • Pine is another popular choice as it lights easily and produces great flames that dance in the hearth, but like other softwoods such as cedar or spruce, it doesn’t produce a lot of heat.
  • If you are looking for an eco-friendly option, try using bamboo, as it burns slowly and doesn’t create any smoke. Just make sure that the bamboo is completely dry before burning it.
  • Whatever type of wood you choose to burn, always make sure that it is seasoned and dry before starting a fire.

Different ways you can use leftover or scrap pieces of wood after your fires are done

  • Use the leftover wood as kindling to start your next fire. This will help you save on buying new kindling, and it’s a great way to recycle!
  • If you have a lot of leftover wood, use it to create a wooden fence or barrier around your yard. Not only will this keep animals out, but it can also help keep your yard looking neat and tidy.
  • Create wood planters to grow flowers or vegetables in! This is a great way to make use of leftover pieces, plus it adds a gorgeous touch to the outside of your home.
  • Scrap wood makes for an excellent kindling source when you’re out camping. Keep a few pieces in your camping bag and you’ll be able to start a fire even when the woods are wet.
  • If you have a lot of small scraps of wood, use them to create a homemade bird feeder! This is a fun project for kids, and it’s a great way to help out your local wildlife.
  • Finally, use your leftover wood to create a beautiful and functional piece of furniture. There are tons of different projects you can try, so be creative and have fun!

Which kind of firewood is best for fireplace? This is a question that often comes up during the colder months, when people start using their fireplaces more frequently. The truth is, there isn’t one specific type of wood that’s best for all fireplaces. It really depends on the kind of fireplace you have and what kind of fuel it uses.

That being said, there are a few types of wood that are generally considered to be better choices than others. Hardwoods like oak, ash, maple, and birch are fantastic options because they produce a lot of heat. These woods also tend to burn for a long time so you won’t have to keep refilling the fireplace as often!

In addition, if your fireplace is able to use both wood and gas fuels at the same time then it’s best to go with an equal mix of both. This will ensure that you’re able to achieve the highest possible heat output while also extending the life of your fireplace as much as possible, which is always a good thing!

Things you should never do with any type of Firewood (i.e., don’t burn wet, unseasoned, or painted woods)

  • Never burn treated wood (i.e., impregnated with chemicals for termite prevention). It emits toxic fumes and it is bad for the environment.
  • Never burn pressure treated wood. It emits toxic fumes and it is bad for the environment.
  • Don’t use plywood, chipboard or OSB (oriented strand board) as they’re highly flammable and full of formaldehyde which can cause serious respiratory problems to you and your family members. This type of wood should only be used for kindling.
  • Don’t burn cardboard, paper or any other type of garbage. They produce a lot of soot and creosote which can damage your chimney and even start a house fire.
  • Always use dry, seasoned wood in your fireplace to avoid creating dangerous conditions like creosote build-up.
  • Never burn painted or stained wood, as the chemicals are extremely toxic and produce poisonous gases when burned.
  • Don’t use metal to start your fire because it can react with the hot slag in chimneys which will corrode, eat away at metals and damage masonry surfaces. Use natural fiber cloths or newspaper to get your fire started.
  • Never burn household garbage like plastics, rubber or leather because they can emit toxic fumes when burned and release heavy metals into the air which you breathe in every day.

Please avoid burning chemicals (i.e., paint thinners) as it is highly flammable and releases poisonous gases when burned.

  • Never burn the following: rubber, plastics or any synthetic material (i.e., styrofoam), as they release poisonous gases when burned and can cause an explosion if there’s a buildup of flammable gas in your fireplace chimney.
  • Don’t use gasoline to start your fire because it is highly explosive and can easily cause a fire. Always use a safe and approved fireplace starter like crumpled paper or kindling wood.
  • Finally, keep in mind that different types of wood burn differently so it’s important to experiment with different types of woods to see which ones work best for your fireplace. Some people prefer burning hardwoods like oak, maple or beech while others prefer burning softwoods like pine.
  • Never burn painted or stained wood because it releases poisonous chemicals when burned and can cause an explosion if there’s a buildup of flammable gas in your fireplace chimney.
  • Use natural fiber cloths to get your fire started instead of using metal because it can react with the hot slag in chimneys and corrode.
  • Never burn household garbage because they release poisonous gases when burned and can cause an explosion if there’s a buildup of flammable gas in your fireplace chimney.
  • Always use crumpled paper or kindling wood to start your fire instead of gasoline.
  • Experiment with different types of wood to see which ones work best for your fireplace. Some people prefer burning hardwoods while others prefer softwoods.
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A list of different types of trees that produce good quality logs

for burning in a fireplace

  • Oak
  • Apple
  • Pine
  • Birch
  • Maple

When choosing what kind of firewood to burn, you want to consider the type of tree that it comes from. Different types of trees produce different quality logs for burning. Here is a list of some popular types of trees that produce good quality logs for burning in a fireplace.

Environmental Protection

Agency (EPA) has classified firewood as a renewable resource, which is good news for people who like to use their fireplace to heat their homes.

But not all firewood is created equal. The best type of firewood for your fireplace will depend on the climate where you live and the types of trees that grow in your area.firewood

In general, hardwoods are better for burning in a fireplace than softwoods. Hardwoods tend to produce more heat and less smoke than softwoods.

The most popular types of hardwood firewood are oak, hickory, ash, and maple. These woods are all dense and burn well with a hot flame that creates very little smoke.

If you live in a cold climate, you will probably want to use a hardwood firewood like oak or hickory. These woods will help generate more heat and keep your home warm.

In contrast, if you live in a warm climate, you may want to use a softwood firewood like pine or cedar. These woods burn quickly and produce a lot of smoke, which can help keep your home cool in the summertime.

If you live where both hardwoods and softwood trees grow, then mix different types of firewood together to create an ideal burning blend for your fireplace.

Safety Tips

  • When using a fireplace, always be aware of your surroundings and keep flammable objects away from the flames.
  • Do not leave the fire unattended, and make sure it is completely out before going to bed or leaving the house.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher nearby in case of emergencies.
  • Children and pets should be kept at a safe distance from the flames.
  • The fireplace should be cleaned regularly to remove any ash that accumulates inside it.
  • Never burn garbage or anything other than firewood in your fireplace, as this can release toxic fumes into the air and spread dangerous sparks onto combustible surfaces nearby.
  • Make sure you have a working smoke alarm in your home.
  • Never use flammable liquids to start or accelerate the growth of a fire, as this can lead to serious injury and damage from gas leaks.
  • Inspect electrical appliances regularly for frayed wires that could pose a fire hazard if left unattended near an open flame.
  • If your fireplace is not in use, keep the damper closed to prevent heat and sparks from escaping.

Now that we’ve gone over some safety tips, let’s talk about what kind of firewood is best for your fireplace.

FAQs

What are the different types of firewood?

The most common types of firewood are oak, ash, and hickory. However, you can use just about any type of wood to start a fire. Just be sure that the wood is dry and free of bugs or other pests.

How do I store my firewood?

Wood should be stored in a dry location, such as your garage or shed. It shouldn't get too cold outside during the winter months and never be stacked right next to other combustible objects like wood piles or fences. You also want to make sure that air can circulate around it while still keeping it covered from moisture and rain water.

How much firewood do I need?

For an average size fireplace, you'll want to have two full bundles of firewood available at all times. If you're having friends or family over during colder months, then one bundle is sufficient for up to three hours worth of fires. You should also plan on buying a couple more bundles to ensure that you have enough for the whole season.

How large should my firewood be?

You want your firewood to be about as long as an arm and only around two fingers wide. This ensures good airflow through the wood, allowing it to burn evenly. You don't want any pieces of wood too big or too small, as they'll be difficult to ignite and could put your fire out.

What's the best way to start a fire with wood?

The easiest way to start a fire with wood is by using newspaper or kindling. You can either place the paper underneath the logs or light it and hold it up to the wood until it catches fire.

What's the best way to burn wood?

You should start a small, steady fire and then leave it alone until you see that it has caught all of the logs on fire. This will ensure that your fireplace is safe and allows for an even burning process throughout the night or day. Never pour liquid onto fires made with wood – this will only create more smoke and increase the risk of a fire.

Can I use charcoal in my fireplace?

It is not recommended to use charcoal in your fireplace because it emits harmful chemicals when burned. Stick with natural, untreated firewood to keep your home healthy and safe.

Conclusion

If you are wondering what kind of firewood is best for your fireplace, then there are many options to consider. No matter which wood you choose, the most important thing will be that it smells good and functions well inside the home atmosphere.

Conclusion If you are wondering what kind of firewood is best for your fireplace, then there are many options to consider. No matter which wood you choose, the most important thing will be that it smells good and functions well inside the home atmosphere.